MEMBER PROFILES

Get to know the chapter’s committee chairs, title sponsors and fellow members with our Member Profiles below.

SUBMISSIONS WELCOME

Interested in introducing yourself to fellow AIA Cincinnati chapter members? Complete and submit a member profile form to info@aiacincinnati.org.

Looking for inspiration on great projects completed by chapter members? Check out Project Profiles.

Jocelyn Privett, Showroom Manager, Tisdel Distributing

What does your firm do? 

We are the exclusive distributor resource showroom for Sub-Zero, Wolf, Asko, Faber, Best and Scotsman in the Midwest and Midsouth. We are the direct link between the manufacturer and more than 100 dealer showrooms. We are passionate about excellence and bring a depth of knowledge to our industry that is surpassed by none. 

How did you get into this field? 

I was in custom residential cabinetry for 16 years prior to coming to Tisdel. I had used the brands with my clients and enjoyed the support and knowledge that the team brought to our industry, as well as the longevity and customizations that their products provided. When Rufus (my rep) was retiring, he asked me to be his replacement. 

How does your firm work with architects? 

We have two collaborators at Tisdel that work with architects and their clients. On a business level, Amanda Cook engages the architects and reviews the needs of their projects. When a client wants to come into the showroom for a tour and product selection, I meet with them. On the education front, we provide CEU opportunities and soon we will have the largest showroom within this region that architects can bring their clients to for an immersive experience. 

How has the pandemic impacted your company’s work? 

While the showroom was closed to in-person visits for some time, we have now been able to reach out to clients through Zoom consultations. This has broadened our capabilities in our expansive region to give distanced customers the same enrichment that Cincinnatians receive. 

Who or what inspires you? 

People with both drive and compassion inspire me. Years ago, I began to admire Elon Musk for his commitment to drive and innovation. Not only through Tesla but Space-X, as well. He pushes past his failures to create a bold vision and is never afraid to announce it to the masses, as crazy as his ideas may first seem.

What is your favorite building and why? 

I don’t have just one favorite building but due to my love of organic elements and being a detail-focused person, my favorite architect is Louis Sullivan. Interning in Chicago, I got to walk by much of his work in my time there. 

When you’re not working (and we’re not in a pandemic,) what do you love to do? 

I am a creative nature-lover at heart. When I am not working, I enjoy being outdoors first and foremost. We love going on nature walks with our two kids or for a bike ride while I run with our pandemic-adopted aussie/coonhound mix. 

What is your favorite pandemic-safe activity (aka what keeps you sane during COVID chaos)? 

During Covid, I have taken up drawing and art again. Mainly re-invigorating my fondness for pastels after finding my discontinued Grumbacher favorites for sale on Ebay (as the stores were all closed). I have also newly expressed my love for graphic design and typography by hand-illustrating inspirational posters for friends and family.

Tisdel Distributing is a longtime supporter of AIA Cincinnati, beginning as a CRANawards sponsor before becoming one of our first Title Sponsors. Learn more at tisdeldistributing.com.

Vince Terry, AIA, NCARB, NOMA, Regional Director of Business Development, Moody Nolan

Looking back on your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of? 

When looking back on 2017, I think about how the nation had just experienced eight years of Barack Obama, our first African American President in history. The economy was stimulated, we had recently elected a new president, and many were gainfully employed. After working on the AIA board for five years in various capacities, I was excited to explore new ways to expand programming for our members and rebuild our identity as 2017 Chapter President; we were ready to rebrand ourselves as Cincinnati’s finest AIA chapter ever and reestablish a home office.

Due to the recession of 2008, our chapter was homeless as far as having a physical address. Many of the chapter leaders talked about finding a new home for our office and we targeted OTR as the best environment, Renaissance, Diversity and Central. We believed that this selection was appropriate for economic and architectural revival in Cincinnati. My role during the 2017 presidency was to guide our board through due diligence review and 5-year strategic plan in order to finalize an almost unanimous decision to reopen our new AIA chapter office. This included the associate design entities within what is now called the CCAD (Cincinnati Center for Architecture + Design). The CCAD is a collaboration of the annual Cincinnati Design Awards organizations, ASID, ASLA, IIDA, SEGD, and AIA, demonstrating successful solutions within the tri-state design community.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture? 

In my career, the biggest change I have seen, is our ability to work with many different client types outside of the actual owner. Our contract alliance seems to continually grow from developer, non-profit, contractor/CMs, third party agencies, and property managers. It amazes me to see how many times the client would like one manager to oversee all the moving parts of a new development and where our value lies in that process.

With design/build, design assist, and IPD strategic approaches, our work continues to be divided and distributed to vendors and installers. We must continue to manage our client’s expectations and play a larger facilitation role in our industry. Projects are becoming more sophisticated with innovation and scale; the budget does not always align with the client’s wishes. Lastly, the new virtual world of Revit, Enscape, VIR, Rhino, as well as the BIM 360 Model tool of producing design and working documents to describe design intent of the architect, has drastically changed the field of architecture. These tools are providing a new resource for visualizing the result and our ideas for the completed project. Design/Build procurement is also diversifying our field and how we deliver good architecture. This could be a good thing if we manage our new clients and their expectations correctly.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today? 

Our challenge is two-fold, the racial disharmony in our culture has exploded in 2020 along with the Covid-19 virus. Both public health emergencies will cause a great shifting in the workplace that we must respond to.

Covid-19 has morphed our lifestyles drastically and we now have both work and play all within the confines of our homes. How we plan for flexibility in this new reality will be interpreted differently and best practices will need to be endorsed by our clients. Creating safe workplace environments that still cultivate collaboration and improve productivity is essential.

Diversity and inclusion will also be an ongoing challenge with 13% of our country’s population representing Black Americans, while only 2% of Black America are represented in the architectural community. It saddens me to know that our country has shown and demonstrated its concern and love for other national crises over the years but could not lean-in to rectify this cultural crisis.

Love and hate are very strong terms to use, but what else motivates one to make such sacrifice and show great determination to suppress and dominate a people or an industry? Over the last 12 years, I have seen much love given and delivered as “bailout funds” authorized and distributed to the auto industry, banking/investment industry, housing mortgage industry, and now we are experiencing the payroll PPP bailout followed by federal aviation funding. However, the Black American that has been suppressed and damaged for more than 100 years after slavery. There has not been a “bail out” but instead, they have been left behind to fend for themselves. Some made it, but most did not. But laws and zoning and banking practices have been written to suppress and publicly pin down instead of free up and respect Black Americans. It is not the fruit of love to treat another with suspicion and distrust. So, I am challenged with what motivates the political law maker, banker, and policy makers that strategize toward controlling the outcome and success of the Black American.

My hope is that in response to the 2020 crisis, many will begin to pivot and reframe their focus to be more relevant to today’s needs. If we do not get involved now advocating to fix climate health and structural racism, it will never be done. We must understand the buildings that frame the most disenfranchised neighborhoods have been robbing those people of their mental and physical health. This leaves them vulnerable to unpredictability in this uncertain climate. Knowing this, we should continue to strive to create spaces that are healthy, safe, and equitable.

How has AIA membership benefited you? 

Community: The AIA community is wonderful and provides a great space to build your brand and reputation throughout the region. I’m excited to be in the organization and have grown because of the interactions and friendship that I have been able to form. It is amazing that there will always be strength in numbers and power with unity. The AIA provides a place that we can speak with one voice. As the unity of our voice grows in volume, the AIA can advocate for change where it needs to be. We can speak truth to our government leaders and their old policies. I have personally benefited from AIA by increasing my exposure to governance and transparent leadership on the board. Holding several offices throughout my six years on the board allowed me to build authentic relationships that resulted in teaming opportunities for new work. This continues to benefit me and my practice here at Moody Nolan’s OTR Office.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate? 

The only advice I could offer a recently registered architect is to seek and provide leadership on your projects; do this with an open mind and always listen to your client’s goals and needs. Architects are always being challenged by our neighboring support industry of construction management and unfortunately, which has been taking our market share and leadership roles. The architect must command the trust and understanding of many more components of the development process. Yes, beyond just good design. Our work is so much more than just a complete and functioning space. We must strive to inspire our clients to enhance relationships, promote unity, and assure equity in addition to practical items of reducing carbon footprint, waste, and initial costs while promoting inclusivity and storytelling within their newly crafted space.

Tom Shumaker, Director of Business Development, Cincinnati Commercial Contracting

What does your firm do? 

Cincinnati Commercial Contracting (CCC) is a full-service real estate development, general contracting, and construction management company. CCC was founded in 1979 to provide clients with full service commercial construction management and real estate development expertise.  

From retail stores and restaurants to manufacturing facilities and fabrication shops, CCC’s expert construction management team provides thorough preparation, superior craftsmanship, and attention to detail to each project. That is how we have done business for over 40 years. 

How did you get into this field? 

I graduated from UC DAAP in 1985 and started out life as an architect. In the early ‘90s, I was lured to the “dark side” of real estate development, and never looked back. Over my career, I have earned experience in real estate development, design, construction, corporate real estate management, and business development.

How does your firm work with architects? 

For more than 40 years, Cincinnati Commercial Contracting has been able to provide the most value to clients when we are engaged day one as a member of the project team. It really doesn’t matter if CCC or the design firm is the project lead. The important thing is that the client enjoys direct collaborative access to both of our expertise from the outset of the project. We especially thrive in a design assist role, particularly when design professionals seek our expertise with pre-engineered metal building systems. 

What is your favorite building and why? 

Although it might seem trite, I am still a huge fan of Frank Lloyd Wright. And although choosing a “favorite” FLL building is a bit like choosing a favorite child, Falling Water and Taliesin West are hard to surpass. But locally, Union Terminal is it hands down.

When you’re not working, what do you love to do? 

Golf and travel. I’m also a life-long POTUS geek, and read a lot of presidential biographies and U.S. History.

Cincinnati Commercial Contracting is AIA Cincinnati’s newest Title Sponsor. Learn more at cccontracting.com.

Dan Becker, Designer, The V Collective

How did you get into this field? 

Prior to joining The V Collective, I spent about 18 years working in Architecture firms. I graduated with a four year architecture degree from Miami University (Bach. Of Science in Environmental Design) and was on track for graduate school. Because of life’s circumstances through those early years, I continued working and gaining valuable experience from various firms, which eventually directed me into construction management. In that time, I enjoyed serving as Associate Director for AIA Columbus (2000-2001) and AIA Ohio Valley Region Associate Director (2001) along with various local AIA committees.

What experience do you draw from in your work at The V Collective? 

My work as a designer and project manager at The V Collective really combines my architectural background of both design and construction management but takes it from the macro-level of an entire building or room to this very specific micro-level of the cabinetry and/or trim and these elements within the larger context.

How does your firm work with architects? 

Depending on the nature of a project, our team can either help execute the design set forth by the architect, usually through shop drawings, or we can be more collaborative on design and production. It just really depends on the nature of the project and the expectations of the architects and owners. For architects with whom we have an on-going relationship, we are sometimes involved early in the process to quote on schematic design documents. It helps establish early budgets for architects and builders to further guide the later document phases.

What inspires you? 

I do love a good building. Or just the really beautiful woodwork at a home like the Henry Probasco House in Clifton. I admire that attention to detail and the craftsmanship. I was a tour guide for Architreks here locally and I loved sharing the architecture and history of our city and trying to help others understand that what is here is special and has value.

What is your favorite building and why? 

That’s nearly impossible to determine. I’ve loved buildings since I was a kid! I’m drawn to buildings that have a really strong sense of materiality and permanence with an attention to detail. Locally, I would probably say Union Terminal but H.H. Richardson was an early favorite architect and I love Trinity Church and its setting in Copley Sq. in Boston. But I can get excited about a lot of them. And I certainly have opinions on what I don’t like!

When you’re not working, what do you love to do?

I enjoy the gym and traveling. I am on a quest to visit all 50 states. (Three more to go!) My travels usually include either hiking out in nature or doing some sort of urban exploring and immersing myself in a city’s architecture and culture. A lot of times I might combine the two experiences. For instance a recent road trip out west included the Badlands and Black Hills but also included a tour of the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines and a stop in Fort Collins, Colorado to check out their brewery scene.

The V Collective is a longtime supporter of AIA Cincinnati, especially our CRAN community, before becoming one of our first Title Sponsors. Learn more at thevcollective.com.  

Robert L. Knight, AIA, National Client Manager, Partner Engineering and Science

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?

Representative of AIA Ohio on the first OKI Regional Convention; Participating on the AIA Documents Committee; Member of the AIA Leadership Institute – Inaugural Class; Co-chair of AIA Ohio’s 2030 Challenge; and Raising funds for public art with the 2003 Beaux Arts Ball.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture?

The cyclical nature of the industry, and how firms struggle to grow as we encounter recurring economic downslides.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

Maintaining a position of leadership for client’s need with regard to design and development of facilities and real estate. 

How has AIA membership benefited you?

AIA continues to be a thought leadership vehicle and the resource for our industry on trends that affect our profession. These values have helped me change with the profession and industry to be a valued professional to my clients.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate?

Seek to constantly learn and allow your career path to be fluid.

Dave Greene, Montgomery Branch Manager/Cincinnati Marvin Sales, Marsh Window and Door Classics

What does your firm do? 
Marsh is a wholesale supplier of Marvin Windows and Doors for the residential, commercial, institutional, and historic markets. We have over 28 years of supplying premium window and door solutions for ultra-luxury residential, new and remodel, as well as replacement projects for those markets. Marsh has a reputation for unsurpassed knowledge and expertise as trusted advisors to Cincinnati’s residential and commercial architectural firms. In addition to Marvin Windows and Doors, we distribute several other premium and unique product solutions to meet the needs our of our architect partners, contractors, and homeowners.

How did you get into this field? 
Growing up I always thought I would end up in architecture and construction. After serving in the military I graduated from Sinclair with an Associates in Architecture and then Bowling Green State University with a degree in Construction Management and worked for a few contractors. I soon discovered my interest in sales and subsequently in 1994 I came to Marsh selling Marvin in Dayton, Ohio. After 2 years, I transferred to the Cincinnati market in 1996.

How does your firm work with architects? 
Marsh has ability, experience, and expertise to advise, collaborate, and facilitate specifying complex window and door solutions. We strive to be Trusted Advisors for Architects and their clients. We enjoy the collaboration with architects and seeing their designs come to fruition. We are considerate of their clients budgets and interests to ensure we are matching our products and services to meet both. We have a great appreciation and passion for good architecture and thoroughly enjoy our relationships with Cincinnati’s most accomplished architectural firms. Lastly, we use our network of fellow contractors, subcontractors, and vendors to help connect architects to these construction and material vendor solution providers.

Who or what inspires you? 
As a closet architect, I’m inspired by having an inside view of watching architects perfect their craft with great talent. I’m also inspired by fellow professionals in the architecture and construction industry, including those at Marsh who have built incredible careers as industry leaders and mentors.

What is your favorite building and why? 
Music Hall. Although I did not work directly with the architect and contractor, I watched the renovation closely. You may know that Music Hall was one of the most historically significant projects that Marsh and Marvin has ever worked on. Marvin even featured Music Hall in their IBS Booth in Orlando in 2018. My Marsh teammate Jeff Roth did a fantastic job of expediting the custom Marvin windows fabricated to match original window details designed by Samuel Hannaford in 1877. The building has an incredible history and the stories of its original construction and final renovations are fascinating.

When you’re not working, what do you love to do? 
Boating, hiking, biking, shooting, traveling, and Jeeping are my hobbies outside of work. We’ve been to Florida and recently spent 9 days out west in Utah, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.

How has the pandemic impacted your company’s work? 
Other than a few inconveniences, we’ve been very fortunate. Our business is strong and the prospects going into 2021 are promising.

What is your favorite pandemic-safe activity? 
Boating, hiking, biking, shooting, traveling, and Jeeping have been my distractions. I’m always trying to find something to do outside to avoid the pandemic restrictions and hysteria.


Marsh Window and Door Classics is a long-time supporter of AIA Cincinnati, especially our CRAN community and special events like the CRANawards and Sycamore Creek. This year, Marvin/Marsh is AIA Cincinnati’s Sesquicentennial Sponsor. For more information on Marsh window and Door Classics, visit their website marshbuild.com.

Amie Anderl

Amie Anderl, Director of Cincinnati Branch, Hamilton Parker

What does your firm do? 

Hamilton Parker has over 85 years of experience in supplying residential and commercial building supplies for the entire state of Ohio, including tile, stone, masonry, fireplaces and garage doors in Central Ohio, and supplying exclusively tile and setting materials in the Cincinnati and Cleveland markets. Hamilton Parker also supplies additional building materials through Construction Building Components (CBC,) it’s National Accounts Division. Hamilton Parker has also recently added two LVT lines to their offerings.

How did you get into this field? 

I have a degree in Interior Design from Bowling Green State University and while I never did 100% design, I’ve always managed to stay connected to the design industry. My first job out of college was sales for a cabinet company. I ended up in the Dayton area 15 years ago with Design Forum, doing new business development and then got into the flooring business after that stint. That was where I was introduced to Hamilton Parker. When I heard they were opening a location in Cincinnati, I knew I wanted to be part of the team. The rest is history.

How does your firm work with architects? 

Hamilton Parker’s core purpose is to achieve our customer’s vision through trust and expertise. In order to do this, our team works with customers to specify the right materials for both residential and commercial projects, keeping both budget and timelines in mind. 

Who or what inspires you? 

I’m inspired daily by the talent that we get to work with and the projects we get to be a part of. I also love to travel and am inspired by different cities, cultures and countries.

What is your favorite building and why? 

September 2019 I had the chance to travel to Bologna, Italy, for work and I kept passing this building and just loved it – sorry for the picture quality but I was hanging out the window of the cab trying to capture it. I have no clue who the architect is or what it’s used for but it was so out of place among all of the thousand-year-old buildings and it was not only in my favorite color but happened to be a beautiful, large-format glossy tile. What’s not to love?

When you’re not working, what do you love to do? 

Spending time with my 4-year-old son, family and friends, traveling, art, checking out new restaurants, breweries, projects around my place and being outdoors soaking up the sun!

Hamilton Parker is a long-time supporter of AIA Cincinnati’s CRAN community, including sponsoring the CRANawards before becoming one of the first Title Sponsors. To find out more about Hamilton Parker, please visit their website: hamiltonparker.com.

Afsaneh Ardehali, UNM

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing? 

Generally speaking, I believe my accomplishments for the year 2000 would include: increasing membership and sponsorship, as well as expanding continuing education luncheon series. However, what I am most proud of would be Urban Poetry 1, the first AIA Cincinnati national design competition held in collaboration with the City of Cincinnati. This event challenged architects and designers from various design disciplines across the nation to “transform an ordinary parking lot in Downtown Cincinnati into an extraordinary urban moment.” The 45 ingenious submissions we received were exhibited in Downtown Cincinnati Public Library to educate the public and inspire their imagination.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture? 

On one hand, in recent years, greater environmental consciousness, energy efficiency, and more concerted move toward sustainable designs have been important areas of change in architecture. On the other, although the number of women students in schools of architecture are nearly equal to the number of men these days, the promotion of women as well as minorities in higher levels of architecture practice are far behind. 

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

Regardless of the concerted efforts of AIA in national, regional, and local levels, we still have a long way to go till the general public develops full understanding and appreciation of the value of what it is that we bring to the table. I firmly believe our greatest challenge still remains to be in redefining our role and regaining our power in forming the physical, social, cultural, and environmental consciousness. 

How has AIA membership benefited you?

Like most architects, I always enjoyed designing until I experienced the joy of teaching architecture. It was being in AIA and my contacts through AIA that I found my calling in academia.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate? 

Find your passion in a particular aspect of the field and develop your expertise. However, be flexible in your attitude, versatile in your collaborations, and most importantly be the expert in marketing your work.

Robert W. Dorsey, FAIA, Professor Emeritus of Construction Science, University of Cincinnati

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?

I was AIA Cincinnati President 1981 and co-chaired the AIA National Convention in Cincinnati in 1980. Hosting that convention is one of the things I’m proudest of—it was very successful. Cincinnati had last hosted the AIA convention in 1889 when the AIA and Western Association of Architects merged.

David Richards was the AIA Cincinnati President in 1980. He, four other AIA Cincinnati presidents – Jerry Kelch, Kenneth Wright, Gordon Garn, and Jack Gartner – and I all graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1956. That must be a record!

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture?

The computer has to be the biggest change to the practice of architecture. I am probably one of the last to have done all the drawing by hand.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

The overall economy is the biggest challenge right now. A number of firms are furloughing people. The coronavirus hanging around has already affected the international economy and will obviously affect the built environment.

How has AIA membership benefited you?

Being involved with AIA was very important. We had monthly meetings that were well attended and brought in speakers. When Randy Vosbeck, FAIA was the AIA National president in 1981, he came to talk about a plan to encourage energy efficient architecture. 

Going to meetings, meeting other architects, getting involved with the national convention—those activities were very important to me. I got to know people at the national office and architects from across the country.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate?

Become involved in AIA and in your community. Serve on the zoning board or planning commission, and maybe even run for office. There are not enough architects involved in government. Get licensed. Once we got out of school and started working, getting licensed was THE objective. Then continue to get as much education as you can through continuing education and even advanced degrees.

Brian Baumgardner, Associate Client Executive, Oswald Companies

What does your firm do?

Oswald Insurance Companies provides risk management and insurance brokerage services with a focused lens on professional liability insurance.

How did you get into this field?

My grandfather owned an insurance agency and during college I completed a couple of internships and fell in love with the business.

How does your firm work with architects?

We help them be better practitioners of risk. The design and construction field is risky and although we can’t help them be better designers we can help them see the risks and manage accordingly through the services we offer, which include contract reviews, education opportunities and deep experience in the design industry.

What inspires you?

Helping our clients manage their business and serving as a consultant role for them. We help them walk through the business challenges they face so they can do what they do best which is design.

What is your favorite building and why?

I do not know that I have one favorite building but rather love old photos of buildings in black and white to see how they have changed and updated over the years.

When you’re not working, what do you love to do?

I love spending time with my family (my wife Margo and two awesome kids, Tripp-6 and Taylor-4) whether going to the farm or playing in the backyard just watching them grow up is a blessing.  When I am not with them, I enjoy staying active, playing golf, tennis and yoga and being outside are just a few of my joys.


In addition to being an AIA Cincinnati Title Sponsor, Oswald Companies has participated in the CRANawards, Golf Outing, Sycamore Creek Sporting Clays, and Cincinnati Design Awards. Learn more at OswaldCompanies.com.

Michael R. Mauch, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Principal, RWA Architects, Inc.

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?   

I was President in 2009. Firms were laying off in mass. The market had just crashed and AIA Cincinnati lost about 20% of its members. Many Architects were out of a job wondering what to do. I knew my year wasn’t about me, it was about them. Keeping the Chapter members who were left engaged through their committee work by empowering the Chairs of those committees to lead, gave those members who remained something to focus on. My most proud accomplishment was being able to encourage and support those young leaders to lead their committees during one of the Chapter’s darkest hours and come out on the other side. I was quite proud of those folks and what they accomplished keeping the Chapter engaged. Many of those Chairs went on to become leaders on the Board.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture? 

How we convey information and the medium used is the biggest change since I started in this profession. I started out in school with bum wad. On co-op I started out using lead on vellum. Press type. And 2080 Xerox copies. Then it went to ink on mylar. With LeRoy lettering. Then plastic lead on mylar. Then pin bar. Then digitizing. Then came the Apple computer and digital 2-D drafting. Then 3-D modeling. Now virtual reality. I am currently waiting for my brain chip.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today? 

There are many but the one that worries me the most is the challenge of holding on to our slice of the pie. Everyday, some other group or organization is trying to take away our piece of the pie in the design process. Our relevance and value is slowly being eroded away and Architects seem to be too passive to resist.

How has AIA membership benefited you? 

I have benefitted tremendously in being an AIA member by giving me the opportunity to meet so many talented people across the country. And I mean really good people, great Architects.  It seemed the more I got involved in AIA, especially through the AIA’s Custom Residential Architects Network (CRAN), the more I grew as an Architect and as a person. The benefit wasn’t about getting more work, it was about being better. I like to say that the AIA doesn’t make you an Architect, the AIA makes you a better Architect.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate? 

It is simple really. Get licensed as soon as you can. Licensure is not the end, it is the beginning. Get involved in the profession you made a choice to be in. Get engaged with your Chapter.

Jeff Kirker with AIA Cincinnati Chapter President Cynthia Williams

Jeff Kirker, Kirker Kubala

What does your firm do?

Kirker Kubala represents over 50 independent lighting manufacturers and offers quality customer service and project management from the idea conception to project completion.

How does your firm work with architects?

Kirker Kubala, Inc. provides specifiers, contractors and distributors with the most innovative lighting selection from today’s leading manufacturers. We offer custom design and installation for indoor and outdoor spaces, from the Art Climb to the Saks 5th Avenue in New York City,  we bring creativity, vision, and experience to every project.

Kirker Kubala got involved with AIA Cincinnati’s golf event before becoming a Title Sponsor in 2013. Learn more at kirkerkubala.com.

John Westheimer President Cincinnati Commercial Contracting

John Westheimer, President, Cincinnati Commercial Contracting

What does your firm do?

Cincinnati Commercial Contracting was founded in 1979 to provide clients with full service commercial construction management and real estate development expertise. From retail stores and restaurants to manufacturing facilities and fabrication shops, CCC’s expert construction management team provides thorough preparation, superior craftsmanship, and attention to detail to each project. That is how we have done business for over 40 years. 

How did you get into this field?

I have been in the commercial real estate business since 1969. I’ve stayed in the business because of a desire to serve others with the construction and real estate development skills that I have acquired over the years.

I started CCC as a commercial real estate development and ownership company. One of our first projects were mini-warehouses. By 1983, the company had three 80,000 SF mini-warehouse developments, making us the largest operator in the area. In 1985, CCC sold its portfolio to Public Storage, then invested heavily in conventional flex, retail, and office buildings.

We began offering commercial construction services to the public in 1995 and became an authorized Butler Manufacturing Builder in 1997. In 2011, CCC was recognized as “Northeast Butler Builder of the Year.” This accomplishment came within 14 years of working with Butler Manufacturing. CCC was selected from a group of over 300 builders. 

Today, CCC continues to be active in the area of real estate development. We currently own over 400 acres of strategically located commercial and industrial land from Walton, KY, north to Springboro, OH. We also own and manage several developments from Monroe, OH, to the Red Bank Corridor. These include vibrant retail, office, and warehouse space. We continue to be heavily invested in providing superior commercial construction services to business owners that are growing, expanding, or renovating within the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana area. 

CCC’s goal of being the highest-value building contractor in the Greater Cincinnati area is simultaneously being achieved and yet improved and relentlessly pursued. We continue to challenge the status quo and push for an ever higher standard of excellence. 

How does your firm work with architects?

We have learned, from decades of experience, that the key to providing the most value to a project is early collaboration with the design team.

It really doesn’t matter if the project delivery is design-bid-build, design-build, or CM at risk. The important thing is that, from day one of a project, we are fully engaged with our architect partner and working together on our client’s behalf. 

Who or what inspires you?

I am constantly inspired by the happiness and continued success of our clients. They inspire me to continually find ways to improve on our process and the quality of work that we produce. 

What is your favorite building and why?

The next one! In all honesty, I cannot say that I have a favorite building or project. I have worked on every type of commercial project, to include everything from retail, restaurant, and hospitality buildings to industrial, warehouse, and office complexes. Our team of professionals know that bringing each job in on-time and on-budget is the standard all clients deserve, and should always expect from their builder. This is the standard that we continually strive to achieve. The highest standard is a happy client.

When you’re not working, what do you love to do?

When I’m not in the office you can find me farming hay, taking care of the land, and making improvements. 

Cincinnati Commercial Contracting is AIA Cincinnati’s newest Title Sponsor. Learn more at cccontracting.com.

Credit: MSA Architects

Submitting Firm: Spohn Associates, Inc.

Project Name: Blue Ash Summit Tower

Location: Blue Ash, Ohio

Date Completed: April 2018

Project Team:

Architect: MSA Architects

Customer: City of Blue Ash

Contractor: Turner Construction

Photographer: Lindsay Nesbitt

Manufacturer Rep/Installers: Spohn Associates, Inc.

Brief Description

Spohn was very excited to see this beautiful project come together! The City of Blue Ash decided they wanted to erect this incredible 180′ observation tower in Blue Ash, Ohio. MSA Architects, Turner Construction and Spohn Associates collaborated to help in the design process. Spohn provided the entire exterior skin. This includes the perforated and ACM panels, the point supported glass, the ornamental railing, etc. 

Because of the scale and complexity of the job, Spohn has had a dedicated project manager on site since its inception. Spohn’s local sales rep in Cincinnati, Andy Muhlada, has also played a big role in the process, and had this to say: “From the beginning this has been a testament to teamwork. As each new challenge arises, there is a confidence that we have all the right players to overcome any obstacle.”

Spohn Associates is a Visionary Partner of AIA Cincinnati’s 2020 VISION program.

AIA Cincinnati Past President Stephen Sendelbeck

Stephen Sendelbeck, Retired, Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati and KZF Design

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?

During my presidency, we focused on organizing and planning Chapter events and communicating with our members to enhance the value of membership. We increased the number of annual events from 7 to 12, and we issued an event calendar for the year in January identifying monthly programs. This calendar was in paper form (this was 1998) and designed by Kelly Kolar so that it could be displayed on each member’s workspace wall. We also established the Chapter’s first website making AIA Cincinnati the first chapter in Ohio to have one, and we used our redesigned newsletter to give monthly updates and reminders.  

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture?

Technology has undoubtedly changed the profession the most since I graduated in 1975. In particular, 3D visualization tools have helped clients understand proposed designs and eliminate surprises.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

The complexity of projects and the speed of delivery required will continue to increase. The challenge to the profession will be to find ways to do this without compromising the quality of our work.

How has AIA membership benefited you?

While I never held national office, I benefited greatly from participating in regional and national conventions/conferences and getting to know professionals from around the country. It was a great way to stay abreast of the changes in the profession and to keep me thinking about how to innovate in my practice.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate?

While architects often prefer to be generalists, developing expertise in a specific area of the profession that excites you will provide greater professional opportunities to you.

Your education has given you special training in problem solving that is not typically taught in other disciplines/professions. That skill will allow you to do more than you realize and make you a true asset to your clients. Look for ways to utilize your problemsolving skills to go beyond the scope of architecture and tackle bigger issues. You will be seen by your clients as innovative and the organizations where you work and volunteer your time as a true leader.

AIA Cincinnati congratulates two members who recently passed their exams to become licensed architects, moving from Associate AIA to full AIA! Kudos on your hard work and impressive accomplishments!

Jessica Dangelo AIA LEED

Jessica Dangelo, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP, LFA

Sustainability Coordinator, Project Coordinator
M+A Architects

As a recent 2018 graduate of the Masters of Architecture program at the University of Cincinnati, where she was awarded the AIA’s Henry Adams Medal, Jessica brings to the table a wealth of diverse experience. Although young, she has studied internationally and worked at various architectural firms around the United States giving her a unique perspective. As a LEED professional, Jessica is passionate about sustainability and actively pursues ways to incorporate it into her designs to make each project the best that it can be. Jessica has cemented M+A’s status as a member and Professional Stakeholder for the Cincinnati 2030 District. 

EDUCATION

Bachelors of Science in Architecture, University of Cincinnati

Masters of Architecture, University of Cincinnati

REGISTRATIONS & CERTIFICATIONS

LEED Accredited Professional, Building Design + Construction (LEED AP BD+C)

WELL Accredited Professional

Living Future Accreditation

Brian Oldiges AIA

Brian G. Oldiges, AIA

Architect
SHP Leading Design

Brian has been at SHP for over 5 years and stayed connected through graduate school at Miami University. He graduated from the Masters of Architecture program just over one year ago and promptly completed his exams within 6 months. Brian brings a disciplined yet eager attitude towards research and experimentation. Is an avid pursuer of advancing technologies and how they can influence our work. Brian has taken special interests in VR and AR systems that can be leveraged throughout project development, and at the opposite end of the spectrum, also harbors a fascination in natural materials and intricate detailing as an amateur woodworker.

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture, University of Kentucky

Master of Architecture, Miami University

REGISTRATIONS & CERTIFICATIONS

Ohio RA

AIA

AIA Cincinnati VISION Class 10

LEED Green Associate

Mansion Hill Custom Floors Coowners

Jeff Rose & Bill Walz, Co-Owners, Mansion Hill Custom Floors

What does your firm do?

We are a custom woodhouse, meaning we specialize in one-of-a-kind, unique custom wood flooring and wall-treatments that you won’t find anywhere else.

How did you get into this field?

Jeff: I started sanding floors at a local company to kill time after I got out of the Navy, before I planned to go to college with my GI Bill in the fall. I found a passion in wood flooring. I also met my partner Bill at that same company. Needless to say, I never made it to college, and Bill and I teamed up and went out on our own in 2011 and we’ve been growing and expanding for the last 9+ years!

Bill: I applied for a job when I was 19 with Schumacher, he called me back a year later and what started as a job turned into my career. That is where I met my business partner Jeff Rose and the story is history.

How does your firm work with architects?

Our main clientele are Architects and Interior Designers. We want to be a trusted resource for the Architectural community, that means making sure our Architect partners have the proper applications and processes in place to make sure that their clients get a superior and functional product. We also serve the Architectural community by providing CEU trainings, all of which count as HSW credits for AIA members.

Who or what inspires you?

Jeff: Creativity is what inspires me. To take a client’s vision and bring it to life is what I’m passionate about.

Bill: My family. I work hard so I can provide the best life for them.

What is your favorite building and why?

Jeff: Le Château Frontenac in Québec, Canada, built in 1893. A little note about this historic building, in 1943 it was the site of secret meetings between Winston Churchill, and Franklin D. Roosevelt to devise invasion plans to end WWII. I love it for its breathtaking architectural design and the attention to detail, including all of the rift and quartered oak in the lobby which is stunning.

Bill: Union Terminal, because of its unique design and historical importance in the tri-state area.

When you’re not working, what do you love to do?

Jeff: I like to golf, work in my garden, and listen to live music.

Bill: When I’m not working, I love going camping, hiking, fishing, being out in nature, and enjoying good food and drinks with my lovely wife and family.

Mansion Hill Custom Floors is a longtime supporter of AIA Cincinnati, especially our CRAN community, and was one of our first Title Sponsors. Learn more at mansionhillcustomfloors.com.

Art Dierks, Chief Operating Officer, The V Collective

What does your firm do?

The V Collective is the parent company to Innerwood, Don Justice Cabinet Makers, and HBI.  We were started by Dan Hueber over 40 years ago as Hueber Brothers Inc., focusing on trim carpentry. After a few years and requests for fine cabinetry, Innerwood was formed to focus on building custom cabinetry. Over the years, as the business grew and a number of acquisitions took place, the companies came together under one name, The V Collective.

Today we work with architects, builders, and homeowners, specializing in the build and installation of fine cabinetry and architectural millwork. 

How did you get into this field?

Prior to joining The V Collective, I spent 14 years as SVP of Operations with TimberTech, a composite decking company. There I was fortunate to be part of a management team that grew the business from just an idea, to over 400 employees, ultimately selling the company. I was looking for an opportunity to run a smaller company with an exceptional product and growth potential, when I ran into Dan and Janine Hueber through a mutual friend. I have been running the company for over five years now and really enjoy the continuous learning experience.

How does your firm work with architects?

We are extremely fortunate to have relationships with a number of architects and are frequently introduced to projects by them. Depending on the nature of a project, our team can collaborate on design, or just manage the build and installation of cabinetry that was already designed and specified. During the process, we work closely with the architect through an exchange of shop drawings. This process ensures our shop is aligned with details specified by the architect, so that homeowners receive their cabinetry as they envisioned. 

Who or what inspires you? 

People…I find great pleasure helping people to develop, cultivating a team, and creating opportunities for employees to succeed. 

When you’re not working, what do you love to do?

My wife Amy and I love boating and travel.  We have two grown children and many friends that live out of town, so we take as many trips as we can.  When possible, we combine travel and boating which we were able to do last year visiting Lake Michigan, Lake Norman, the Jersey Shore and the Hilton Head. 

The V Collective is a longtime supporter of AIA Cincinnati, especially our CRAN community, before becoming one of our first Title Sponsors. Learn more at http://thevcollective.com.

Robert E. Gramann, FAIA, Chairman Emeritus, GBBN Architects

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?

Well, 1977 is a long time ago, but many of the challenges of chapter recruitment and retention remain the same today. Recruit and retain the young and the old (mature). We had a group we called the young guns! Many are practicing today. Our vision was based on a new strategic plan focused on excitement, chapter growth, programs, leadership development, and getting everyone involved! It worked!

We began planning for the national AIA Convention Cincinnati 1980 and began the development of the AIA Foundation.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture?

“TECHNOLOGY HAS ANNIHILATED TRADITIONS.” Designing, drawing, writing, building, communicating, and many more have positively changed our personal and professional lives.

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

We must differentiate ourselves and our role in the design and construction process in the eyes of our clients. Design is the GLUE holding us together, we must lead creatively and innovate. This is the tip of the iceberg – don’t be afraid, embrace change, be the change leader.

How has AIA membership benefited you?

Thanks to very supportive leadership at GBBN Architects, I was encouraged to get involved. I became an AIA JUNKIE which made me a better professional and leader. That was very beneficial to our firm and my other community activities. My AIA involvement as a leader at local, state, and national was invaluable. It enabled me to travel with my family, partners, and friends. Those relationships over time have led to wonderful friendships, contacts, and commissions.

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate?

  • Ask yourself: What do you want to be recognized for? What is your individual strategic plan? The long view. How am I going to improve myself this year?
  • Verbal communication is a skill you must develop. Stay Flexible and Adaptable.
  • Be a “work-a-like-it not a workaholic.” Do GREAT work, have FUN!
  • Focus on relationships, projects will follow.
  • You are what you think you are!
  • Keep your priorities straight, GOD, FAMILY, then WORK.

David S. Collins, FAIA, President, The Preview Group, Inc.

Looking back at your time leading AIA Cincinnati, what are you most proud of accomplishing?

The 1980 National Convention, although I was not president then, I was a member of the local planning committee and chaired the committee to create the Convention Book; fascinating, spirited Cincinnati. The 1980 Convention in my hometown was a great awakening for me to the vibrancy of the national AIA.

In your career, what is the biggest change you’ve seen in the field of architecture?

The digital age has come to full force. However, I still have bumwad!

Looking ahead, what is the biggest challenge facing architects working today?

Gaining back and maintaining preeminence in the design and construction process. 

How has AIA membership benefited you?

I originally joined AIA to meet more architects and to find a job. It has been much more than I could ever hope and not only job-wise, but satisfaction with things that have been achieved at the local, state, and national levels.Perhaps more than ever AIA membership is a significant and important investment for architects to invest as we are addressing pressures in every segment of business and all our lives.  AIA at the national, state and local levels doggedly looks out for our interests in the authorization, legislative and administrative process regulating construction and the licensing that sets architects apart.

But perhaps even more important during times of COVID, serious questions on sustainability and environmental impacts on our lives, the way we practice and the way we design, AIA has provided resources and directions to assist us all to build for a better future.  No one and no other organization provides better leadership, but without your involvement and leadership the weight and power of our united voice is lost.

No, it isn’t cheap, but the value is immeasurable!

What advice would you give to a recent architecture graduate?

AIA is a phenomenal value for anyone that is committed to the profession of architecture.  Ideas are always welcome and opportunities to serve and gain traction on changes you feel are needed are often accomplished by larger numbers of a like mind!